Graveyard

Graveyard
Cedar Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Sunday, May 6, 2012

People In Stone Houses Shouldn't Throw....Glass??

Part of Millionaires' Row, Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia


Mausoleums fascinate my mother.  She likes to go up to them and peer inside.  One of these days, I worry that a spirit resident will look back at her through the door, scare the bejesus out of her, and we'll have to put her in her OWN tomb.  But on she goes, fearless Momma, peeping in the houses of the dead.  Hmmm, perhaps, genetics count for a lot here.  :)

Mausoleums, by definition, are monuments erected as buildings, usually free-standing, that house a deceased's remains.  Many times, they hold an entire family's remains, with niches for coffins or urns.  The more costly ones may include stained glass windows (especially one on the opposite side of the entrance).  And many of them mimic the fashionable architectural styles of their times, for example, the Egyptian Revival which was popular in the early 20th century.  The blog I wrote on the influence of Egypt in American cemeteries can be found at:  Eternally Emulating Egypt   Other popular architectural styles are Neoclassical (like Greek temples) and Gothic (Renaissance church-types with steep roofs and arched windows). 

The source of the word "mausoleum" can be traced to the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, which was the burial tomb of King Mausolus, the Persian governor of his native land, Caria, which is now part of Turkey.  He was born almost four hundred years before Jesus Christ was born.  His tomb, the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, was commissioned by his sister and his widow, and was known as one of the Seven Wonders of the World.  

Today, as well as in the 19th and 20th centuries, mausoleums are usually the choice of burial for the wealthy only.  Most of the ones I show below can be seen in the cemeteries near Philadelphia and Scranton, home to families who made fortunes from coal, railroads and other industries that created great wealth 100-125 years ago.

One of the largest mausoleums in Pennsylvania belongs to Henry Disston, the English-born industrialist who came to America with his parents when he was 14 years old.  Days later, Disston's father died.  Disston took a job as a saw-maker's apprentice, and then several years later, he went into business with his own saw-making business in Philadelphia.  When the business outgrew its space, Disston moved to what was then the outskirts of Philadelphia (now Northeast Philly).  He developed the town of Tacony for his business and also for his workers.   (my husband grew up in Tacony).  Disston was a business owner with a heart, and gave his workers loans and cash advances to build their houses.  He built them a school, a library, and a music hall.  Disston developed a high-quality "skewback" saw, which has a curved side opposite the blade, instead of the traditional straight side .  Disston stated it was lighter in weight and yet was stronger to use than a straight saw, because it was made with his strong tempered steel he developed as well.  Disston made a fortune from his Disston Saw Works, considered at the time to be the largest saw works in the world.  In 1877, he died from poor health, and in 1886, his behemoth mausoleum at Laurel Hill Cemetery was finally finished, at a cost of $60,000.  (I am not sure where he hung out for the nine years between!)  His mausoleum could house several mausoleums, it is so massive.

Enjoy these houses of stone, and if you want to know what the insides look like, feel free to ask my "peeping Mom."  :)  Bah-haha-ha!

Henry Disston's Mausoleum, Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Arlington Cemetery, Upper Darby, PA

Church Hill Cemetery, Martin's Creek, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

Laurel Grove Cemetery, Port Jervis, NY

Laurel Grove Cemetery, Port Jervis, NY

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Not sure what's with the outhouse windows.....Milford Cemetery, Milford, PA

Northwood Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Northwood Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA

Family Mausoleum of Gifford Pinchot, former PA Governor and Father of Forestry and Conservation, Milford Cemetery, Milford, PA (yes, Momma walked up there and looked in)

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, PA

And here is some of what Momma sees when she peeps inside....

 
Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA


Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA


Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA

Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, PA


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